Hawaiian Host AlohaMacs Milk Chocolate

overall rating:

0.75

planets

selen cagla unal
3/26/2022
No items found.

Hawaiian Host AlohaMacs Milk Chocolate can be considered as a last-minute gift with a price of $9-11. I really enjoy the combination of their crunchy macadamias with creamy taste chocolate. They define themselves as genuine, classic and original. But what about the environmental impact that this chocolate causes, from its production to its disposal? When I thought about the environmental effects of cocoa production on tropical regions, I wondered what kind of product review would emerge, and I would not consider this product as sustainable.

AlohaMacs Milk Chocolate is made using sugar, cocoa butter, milk, chocolate, soy lecithin (emulsifier), vanilla and dry roasted macadamia nuts. What they emphasize about the allergy in nutritional information is that this product is processed at a facility that also processes other tree nuts. Since they don't use a qualification such as organic here, the possibility comes to mind that soy lecithin may have been produced from genetically modified (GM) soy plants. According to some research, GM crop technology can lead to a net rise in herbicide use and promote the establishment of herbicide-resistant weeds which is really harmful to the environment and consumers. Also, they do not state where the sugar and vanilla are sourced, and that can be questioned since the sugar industry results in the generation of vast amounts of waste. They do not indicate that their chocolate meets ethical and environmental criteria. In this sense, they do not have certificates such as Organic by International Certification Services, Inc and Fair Trade Cocoa by Fair Trade USA™. These certifications are important in terms of sustainability. For example, Fair Trade strives to improve the sustainability of cocoa-growing so that farmers may better provide for themselves and their families. 

They have package types in various forms. They have 2 pieces, bar, bag, box and resealable bag packaging for their chocolates. Hawaiian Host Chocolate is very lacking in terms of providing information about its packaging. They do not indicate the materials of the packaging clearly. But in general, since chocolate and sweets have the potential to melt even with body temperature, different packaging methods are used since the product cannot become suitable for sale when it is deformed, such as a tear or hole. We do not know if it uses such protection methods as low thermal adhesion, protection from light, low oxygen and water vapour permeability.

Hawaiian Host states that their confections are crafted with select macadamias, collected by hand and creamy chocolate. Because of its innate ability to optimize water consumption and store carbon from the atmosphere, the macadamia tree is regarded as sustainable. Macadamias are grown in Hawaii and throughout the tropics, and each macadamia kernel takes seven months to grow. Afterwards, small white flowers start to appear, which begin to turn into mature nuts that are ready for harvesting. When the nut has reached the proper sugar and oil content, the tree determines that it is ripe and lets it fall. A thick outer husk and a hard inner shell protect the kernel inside, and the macadamia nut is the hardest nut in the world to crack. Each nut is hand-picked by a picker, and the macadamia nuts are supplied fresh from the farm to their macadamia husking plant. In a husking process, nuts are air-dried in large silos (structure in which wholesale materials are preserved or stored) to reduce their moisture content. Next, the husks are removed revealing the inner shell. After that, nuts pass a visual inspection for insect damage mold or any imperfection. In this sense, the leftover husks are recycled as mulch. The shells of macadamias are removed at a nut-cracking factory. Vacuum-sealed bags of macadamia kernels arrive at the candy factory directly from the shell cracking mill to be dry roasted. They apply dry roasting since it enhances the buttery flavour of the macadamia. In addition to ensuring the quality and food safety of the nut Hawaiian Host was the first in the world to utilize this process instead of cooking the macadamia nuts and oil. This process can be considered more environmentally friendly in part because there is no oil process in dry roasting. Here, roasted macadamias are checked again to remove unripe or defective nuts. However, the company is not transparent about its emissions. Emission information from their factories and the policies they implement to reduce these emissions are not included on their websites. 

They do not talk about their cocoa bean production which is a labour-intensive process. In general, the cacao pods that contain the beans are selected once they reach maturity. After that, the pods are split open to reveal the beans, which are subsequently fermented. In the following session, according to their informative video about their production, they start the process with harvested cocoa beans that are cleaned, dried and roasted. Then, cocoa beans are ground and milled into pure chocolate liquor. They use the milk cramp process developed in Europe over 100 years ago to add sweetened condensed milk and sugar that are caramelized to chocolate liquor. Here, chocolate that is ready to be used is stored in temperature-controlled tanks. Then, chocolate depositors form beds, on which roasted macadamias are placed by machines. They say that in a day a single worker may adjust over 10.000 macadamia pieces which can be questioned in terms of workers’ rights. Then, macadamias are covered with chocolate twice, and each confection travels through a temperature-controlled cooling tunnel. About their transportation process, they state that their chocolate is loaded onto delivery trucks and then ship to over 20 countries but their transport emissions are not as transparent as they should be. There are not sufficient data or information about them on their website.

Hawaiian Host is a brand that markets more than 250 macadamia chocolates and various candies in more than 23 countries, with manufacturing facilities in Honolulu and Los Angeles, and further distribution facilities in Tokyo. According to Candy Industry, Hawaiian Host Chocolate will continue its commitments to support local growers and farmers but they do not emphasize that through their websites. They do not give specific information about these issues. Also, they should state their policies which are about gender pay gaps and workers’ rights. There are no announced sustainability reports about the brand, and Hawaiian Host Chocolate does not have a sustainability section on their website, in general, they are focused on their products for sale. In this sense, their chocolate is OU Certified (The Orthodox Union) which increases the products’ marketability. Interestingly, they do not exert enough effort as a brand with such a large supply chain at these times when environmental awareness has started to form in many brands. On the other hand, Hawaiian Host contributes to the Mamoru & Aiko Takitani Foundation, which provides grants and academic scholarships to the Hawaiian community. Since its establishment, the Foundation has awarded more than $2 million in scholarships to Hawaii's qualified high schools.

What it's made of:

0.7

AlohaMacs Milk Chocolate is made using sugar, cocoa butter, milk, chocolate, soy lecithin (emulsifier), vanilla and dry roasted macadamia nuts. What they emphasize about the allergy in nutritional information is that this product is processed at a facility that also processes other tree nuts. Since they don't use a qualification such as organic here, the possibility comes to mind that soy lecithin may have been produced from genetically modified (GM) soy plants. According to some research, GM crop technology can lead to a net rise in herbicide use and promote the establishment of herbicide-resistant weeds which is really harmful to the environment and consumers. Also, they do not state where the sugar and vanilla are sourced, and that can be questioned since the sugar industry results in the generation of vast amounts of waste. They do not indicate that their chocolate meets ethical and environmental criteria. In this sense, they do not have certificates such as Organic by International Certification Services, Inc and Fair Trade Cocoa by Fair Trade USA™. These certifications are important in terms of sustainability. For example, Fair Trade strives to improve the sustainability of cocoa-growing so that farmers may better provide for themselves and their families. 

They have package types in various forms. They have 2 pieces, bar, bag, box and resealable bag packaging for their chocolates. Hawaiian Host Chocolate is very lacking in terms of providing information about its packaging. They do not indicate the materials of the packaging clearly. But in general, since chocolate and sweets have the potential to melt even with body temperature, different packaging methods are used since the product cannot become suitable for sale when it is deformed, such as a tear or hole. We do not know if it uses such protection methods as low thermal adhesion, protection from light, low oxygen and water vapour permeability.

How it's made:

0.8

Hawaiian Host states that their confections are crafted with select macadamias, collected by hand and creamy chocolate. Because of its innate ability to optimize water consumption and store carbon from the atmosphere, the macadamia tree is regarded as sustainable. Macadamias are grown in Hawaii and throughout the tropics, and each macadamia kernel takes seven months to grow. Afterwards, small white flowers start to appear, which begin to turn into mature nuts that are ready for harvesting. When the nut has reached the proper sugar and oil content, the tree determines that it is ripe and lets it fall. A thick outer husk and a hard inner shell protect the kernel inside, and the macadamia nut is the hardest nut in the world to crack. Each nut is hand-picked by a picker, and the macadamia nuts are supplied fresh from the farm to their macadamia husking plant. In a husking process, nuts are air-dried in large silos (structure in which wholesale materials are preserved or stored) to reduce their moisture content. Next, the husks are removed revealing the inner shell. After that, nuts pass a visual inspection for insect damage mold or any imperfection. In this sense, the leftover husks are recycled as mulch. The shells of macadamias are removed at a nut-cracking factory. Vacuum-sealed bags of macadamia kernels arrive at the candy factory directly from the shell cracking mill to be dry roasted. They apply dry roasting since it enhances the buttery flavour of the macadamia. In addition to ensuring the quality and food safety of the nut Hawaiian Host was the first in the world to utilize this process instead of cooking the macadamia nuts and oil. This process can be considered more environmentally friendly in part because there is no oil process in dry roasting. Here, roasted macadamias are checked again to remove unripe or defective nuts. However, the company is not transparent about its emissions. Emission information from their factories and the policies they implement to reduce these emissions are not included on their websites. 

They do not talk about their cocoa bean production which is a labour-intensive process. In general, the cacao pods that contain the beans are selected once they reach maturity. After that, the pods are split open to reveal the beans, which are subsequently fermented. In the following session, according to their informative video about their production, they start the process with harvested cocoa beans that are cleaned, dried and roasted. Then, cocoa beans are ground and milled into pure chocolate liquor. They use the milk cramp process developed in Europe over 100 years ago to add sweetened condensed milk and sugar that are caramelized to chocolate liquor. Here, chocolate that is ready to be used is stored in temperature-controlled tanks. Then, chocolate depositors form beds, on which roasted macadamias are placed by machines. They say that in a day a single worker may adjust over 10.000 macadamia pieces which can be questioned in terms of workers’ rights. Then, macadamias are covered with chocolate twice, and each confection travels through a temperature-controlled cooling tunnel. About their transportation process, they state that their chocolate is loaded onto delivery trucks and then ship to over 20 countries but their transport emissions are not as transparent as they should be. There are not sufficient data or information about them on their website.

Who makes it:

0.9

Hawaiian Host is a brand that markets more than 250 macadamia chocolates and various candies in more than 23 countries, with manufacturing facilities in Honolulu and Los Angeles, and further distribution facilities in Tokyo. According to Candy Industry, Hawaiian Host Chocolate will continue its commitments to support local growers and farmers but they do not emphasize that through their websites. They do not give specific information about these issues. Also, they should state their policies which are about gender pay gaps and workers’ rights. There are no announced sustainability reports about the brand, and Hawaiian Host Chocolate does not have a sustainability section on their website, in general, they are focused on their products for sale. In this sense, their chocolate is OU Certified (The Orthodox Union) which increases the products’ marketability. Interestingly, they do not exert enough effort as a brand with such a large supply chain at these times when environmental awareness has started to form in many brands. On the other hand, Hawaiian Host contributes to the Mamoru & Aiko Takitani Foundation, which provides grants and academic scholarships to the Hawaiian community. Since its establishment, the Foundation has awarded more than $2 million in scholarships to Hawaii's qualified high schools.